The Neville Public Museum

The Neville Blog

The Moon: A Dangerous Place?

Monday, July 18, 2016
The moon seems like such a familiar place these days.  We know how big it is, what it is made of, the atmosphere around it and its relationship to the Earth.  Now think back fifty years.  Scientists during the 1960s had no idea what the moon was like.  Was there a solid surface?  Was there a layer of dust on that surface?  If there was a layer of dust, how deep was that layer?  Was it a couple of feet deep or a couple of hundred feet deep?  If the United States was going to send a man to the moon, these were the kinds of questions that needed to be answered.

Segment aired on WBAY in September 1963, Neville Public Museum Collection 

I had the opportunity of working with the film held in the museum’s collection.  Here I was able to see just how unknown the moon was and NASA's thoughts on their ten year plan and budget for sending a man to the moon.


NASA spent billions of dollars making and launching rockets, satellites, space probes and space crafts into space in order to gather information.  Every one of their programs was essential to the United States’ goal of a landing a man on the moon.  Each program was made to teach the scientists something new about space and the moon.  

Space Programs:
Mercury: 1958-1963
Project Mercury was for sending a man into the Earth’s orbit.  This would help scientists learn how the Earth’s atmosphere works and how to send a man into space and return him safely.  Alan Shepard was the first American man to be launched into space and John Glenn was the first American to orbit the Earth.
Astronaut John Glenn  responds to letter from a local resident, Neville Public Museum Collection
Echo: 1960
The Echo project was used for improving communication knowledge.  

Gemini: 1961-1966
The Gemini Project was intended to learn space travel techniques that would help with the actual moon landings.

Lunar Orbiter: 1966-1967
The Lunar Orbiter Program was a handful of unmanned space crafts sent to the moon to take pictures and help narrow down landing spaces for the future Apollo missions.

Surveyor: 1966-1968
The Surveyor Program’s mission was to send satellites to land on the moon.  This would help determine the kind of surface there was on the moon so then when the time came to send astronauts there, they would know they could land safely on the surface.

Apollo: 1961-1972
The Apollo Program’s purpose was to use all of the information gathered from the previous programs to send a man to the moon, walk on the moon and then return safely home.  On this day in 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts landed and walked on the moon.  In 1971, Apollo 15 astronauts were able to drive on the moon.
1971: Apollo 15 astronaut standing next to the Lunar Rover Vehicle on the moon. Neville Public Museum Collection #7636

It is hard to think that the moon was once an unknown, scary place to not only the public but to scientists as well.  Years and years of intense research went in to determining if space travel was even possible and if a moon landing could be on the long list of future goals.  Fortunately, with dedicated scientists constantly researching, the United States was able to remove the fear of the moon and send astronauts to walk on it.  Since then, NASA has been developing new technology to further their knowledge of space.  This technology is how we are able to learn information about the planets, stars and galaxies and how we are able to view amazing pictures of the incredible Space.


Visit Eyes on the Sky: July 16-November 6, 2016

Andrea Schroeder
UW-Green Bay Intern

Recent Posts


Tags


Archive