The Neville Public Museum

The Neville Blog

Exhibits Exposed

Tuesday, January 12, 2016
One of my favorite things about working at the Neville is that there is always something new to see or do at the museum.  This past year we’ve borrowed two great exhibits (Spies, Traitors, and Saboteurs and Extreme Deep:  Mission to the Abyss), developed a great exhibit about local history (Building Our Community: 100 Years of Architecture and Design), and hosted several art exhibits showcasing works from the region and beyond. 

When our team met recently to discuss ideas for 2016, one of our goals was to find new ways to provide our visitors with unique, one-of-a-kind experiences.  In response, we developed a new program series called “Exhibits Exposed,” which will take place the third Wednesday evening of each month, starting at 6:00.  In this program you’ll join one of our experts on staff for a tour of a featured exhibit, and learn some of the facts and stories that didn’t make it onto the labels.  Then, you’ll have a chance to view some iconic artifacts pulled from our collection that are usually not available to the public.

My colleagues and I are very excited for the chance to share these rarely-heard stories, and even more rarely-seen artifacts from the Neville’s amazing collection.   We hope you’ll be able to join us for these intimate and lively discussions.

 

 

Exhibits Exposed Schedule
January 20:  Iroquois Beadwork and Sisters in Spirit
February 17:  The Fur Trade in Green Bay
March 16:  Feline Fine and the Art of Cats
April 20:  Stories of Life and Death at Fort Howard
May 18:  Art and Artists of Green Bay
June 15:  The Ice Age is Coming
July 20:  Interstellar Overdrive – Eyes on the Sky
August 17:  More of Life and Death at Fort Howard
September 21:  Frozen Green Bay
October 19:  Haunted Wisconsin
November 16:  Holiday Memories

All programs take place the third Wednesday evening of each month at 6:00 and are free with regular museum admission.  Sessions will be capped to ensure a personalized experience; additional sessions will start on the half hour as needed.

Ryan Swadley
Education Specialist

Meet Our Education Specialist

Monday, November 09, 2015

Last March I was offered the amazing opportunity to join the staff of the Neville as the Research Technician.  From helping launch our online image collection Snapshots in Time, to planning youth and adult programs, and to working with our team on the upcoming Life and Death at Fort Howard exhibit, I’ve learned a lot about the museum itself and about the community of Green Bay.  Being from the Madison area I was aware of the Neville and the role Green Bay played in state history (and of course the Packers), but over the past 8 months my family and I have come to learn what a great place to live this really is.  I’m excited to share that I’ve recently been offered the chance to continue my career path here at the Neville by moving into the Education and Events Coordinator position.  I look forward to many more years of providing my friends and neighbors with the types of experiences that make the Neville such a valuable and unique resource.

In this new role I hope to support the Neville’s mission of “Bridging Communities, Connecting Generations” by finding the best ways to serve the many groups and audiences we have here in Brown County.  In the coming months we will be rolling out a handful of new program series’ for kids, families, and adults, and will continue to make changes to our school and youth programs to better fit the needs of educators.  We’ll also be developing programs for scouts, planning summer camps, and making ourselves available for outreach education beyond the museum’s walls.  I look forward to continuing to be part of the exhibit design team where I’ll work to develop interactive and hand’s-on elements for our exhibits that will bring them to life for visitors of all ages.

I can’t say “thank you” enough to my colleagues, new friends, and the community of Green Bay for being so welcoming to my family and me.  I can’t wait to return the favor through my work here at the Neville Public Museum.

 

Ryan Swadley, Education and Events Coordinator 

Summer Programs at the Neville

Friday, July 10, 2015

This summer the Neville Public Museum is proud to host two amazing temporary exhibitions; Spies, Traitors, and Saboteurs:  Fear and Freedom in America on loan from the International Spy Museum in Washington D.C, and Building Our Community:  100 Years of Architecture and Design in Brown County, which was created in collaboration with architects from Berners-Schober A"Building Our Community: 100+ Years of Architecture & Design in Brown County"ssociates.

As if the exhibits weren’t enough, the Neville is providing the following free public programs that explore the themes within our galleries in greater detail!

Architecture, Planning, and Politics

Tuesday, July 14, 2015, 7:00 p.m.

Alderman Mark Steuer will discuss the development of the Fort Howard and Broadway districts, and the efforts of the Historic Preservation Commission to protect and maintain the city’s historic structures.   After the program join Mark for a walking tour of Fort Howard!

America's Most Infamous Terrorist Organization Goes Mainstream: The Ku Klux Klan Marches Down Pennsylvania Avenue

Tuesday, July 21, 2015, 6:00 p.m.

Join UW-Baraboo/Sauk County professor Mike Jacobs for a presentation about the Ku Klux Klan, America's most infamous and formidable terrorist organization. During the 1920s the KKK tried to cast itself as the true expression of American patriotism and the American people.  Millions of people agreed - joining the organization and diversifying their activities beyond their reputation of intimidation and violence. Hate in "Spies, Traitors, and Saboteurs"

Fear, Freedom, and Foreigners: Close to Home

Tuesday, July 28, 2015, 6:00 p.m.

Wisconsin reflected locally the national issues that this series, SPIES, TRAITORS, SABOTEURS: Fear and Freedom in America explores.  Dean Strang, J.D.  will present one of these local stories. A 1917 trail of Italian alleged anarchists in Milwaukee, in the first fearful days off this nation's fighting in WWI, became a proxy proceeding for the deadly, unsolved bombing of Milwaukee's central police station.  That nearly-forgotten bombing killed more American police officers than any other act of terror until September 11, 2001.  

Green Bay Architectural History

Tuesday, August 11, 2015, 7:00 p.m.       

Drawing on the architectural and engineering firm's 117+ year history, several members of Berners-Schober will hold a panel discussion on significant Green Bay structures.  The panel will include Ian Griffiths, Libby Parrish, Derek Gruber, and Kristin Pritchard, along with other firm members who were involved in researching their current Neville exhibit featuring the firm's buildings.  They will discuss the chronology of Green Bay's development through the work of the firm, and answer questions on historic business, public, and residential buildings.

New Teaching Collection Opens Opportunities for Object-Based Learning

Friday, September 05, 2014
How can rocks change from one type to another? What was it like to travel and explore Wisconsin 400 years ago? How did Wisconsin’s early settlers use our natural resources? 
 
Visitors attending the museum’s newest education program will discover the answers to these questions – and more – by analyzing objects from the newly established teaching collection. 

Made possible through the generosity of Schreiber Foods, the teaching collection complements a new educational program consisting of 20 inquiry-driven, object-based lessons that tie into central themes from the museum’s permanent exhibit, On the Edge of the Inland Sea.
Areas of exploration include:

1. Thinking like a Historian
What does it mean to think like a historian?

2. The Rock Cycle
How can rocks change from one type to another?

3. A Landscape Shaped Over Time
How did the Ice Age shape Wisconsin?

4. Plants and Animals of the Ice Age
What plants and animals existed at the end of the Ice Age?

5. Wisconsin’s First People
How do we know about people who lived long ago?

6. Native Americans in the Old Time
How did Native American people live in the Old Time?

7. The Age of Exploration
What was it like to travel and explore Wisconsin 400 years ago?

8. The Fur Trade Era
Who participated in the Fur Trade?

9. Treaty Making
What happened to Native American lands in the early 1800s?

10. Building a Town / Building a State
What did the U.S. government do with the land that it got through treaties?

11. Natural Resources
How did Wisconsin’s settlers use our natural resources?

12. Civil War
How did the Civil War affect the people of Wisconsin?

13. Immigration
How do people make a new life in a new place?

14. Peshtigo Fire
What factors led to the Peshtigo Fire?

15. Mass Production and Domestic Life
How did mass production change domestic life during the Gilded Age?

16. The Age of Invention
How did the inventions of the early 1900s change Green Bay?

17. Native Americans in the Modern World
How has Wisconsin’s history affected its Native American people and their way of life?

18. World War I
How did World War I affect Wisconsin?

19. Culture in Northeastern Wisconsin
What are some of the cultural traditions in Northeastern Wisconsin?

20. Preserving History
How do people take care of Wisconsin’s history?

Supporting these lessons are a diverse array of objects, ranging from a physics model of a glacier, to the teeth left behind by Ice Age titans, to the material culture of the immigrant groups who would later settle in this region. 
 
Students will explore the surfaces and materials of authentic and reproduction objects; feeling their weight; and manipulating them, as they must have been handled by their past owners. The physical nature of the activity allows visitors to experience a sense of discovery and excitement as they draw connections between the unfamiliar objects they hold and their own base of experiences. Two new Samsung tablets will supplement the teaching collection, with music, videos, and primary source materials such as photographs, maps, patents, and more!

One of the major strengths of this program is that it is fully customizable and can be adapted to suit a wide range of audiences, interests, and learning modalities. Listed below are just a few of the possibilities:

1.  Target Audience: School Groups
In addition to “Thinking like a Historian” and “Preserving History,” teachers can select up to three areas of focus. These areas will be covered in-depth during their visit and include elements of role-play, storytelling, and hands-on experiences for their students.

2.  Target Audience: High School Students
High school students can volunteer to become Junior Expedition Leaders. Through this mentorship program, students will learn a thematic area and interpretive techniques before progressing to provide family programming on Explorer Saturdays.

3. Target Audience: Families
Beginning in the new year, families visiting the Neville Public Museum on the first day of the month will have the opportunity to participate in Explorer Saturdays, interacting with the Junior Expedition Leaders and objects from the teaching collection.

4. Target Audience: Individuals with Memory Loss
Finally, these objects enable the museum to extend its collections to create meaningful experiences for older adults with dementia and their caregivers.

There are plenty of opportunities to get involved with this exciting program! Teachers may reserve the program for their students by contacting Kirsten Smith at 920-448-7851 or Smith_KA@co.brown.wi.us. Individuals wishing to volunteer as Expedition Leaders can find the Neville Public Museum’s volunteer application here.

Special thanks to Schreiber Foods for their generous support of this project.

Ashwaubenon School District Technology Project

Monday, May 12, 2014

From the Ice Age to the Age of Invention

Fourth Grade Students Become Virtual Tour Guides


The next time that you visit the Neville Public Museum, bring along your smart phone, tablet, or similar mobile device. With an internet connection and QR code scanner, a 4th grade student from Ashwaubenon School District will be your virtual tour guide. Just look for the QR codes in On the Edge fo the Inland Sea!


What is a QR code?

This symbol is a QR code. It is used to quickly connect smart phones, tablets, and similar mobile devices to online digital content. Scanning these codes in On the Edge of the Inland Sea will direct your mobile device to display a video of your virtual tour guide in the exhibit space.


Who are these tour guides?

One student from each 4th grade classroom in the Ashwaubenon School District was selected to research and create a video interpreting the history of Northeastern Wisconsin. There are 10 videos to discover in On the Edge of the Inland Sea, covering a range of topics from glaciers to electrical inventions.

According to Jamie Averbeck, Ashwaubenon School District’s Technology Integration Specialist who led the project, “Ashwaubenon schools are excited to partner with the Neville Public Museum. It gives our students a real-world experience in creating meaningful digital content for an authentic audience.”


Where can I download a scanner?

QR code scanning applications are available for download in the Google PlayiTunes, and Amazon markets. The museum offers free wireless internet access to guests with non-cellular connected devices.


Visit the Neville Public Museum of Brown County Today!

This exhibit addition entitled, From the Ice Age to the Age of Invention:  The Shaping of Brown County, will open Tuesday, May 13, 2014. 

Be sure to see it while you can and support Ashwaubenon Public School's 4th grade students!



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