The Neville Public Museum

The Neville Blog

Night at the Neville - Astronomy, Geology & Film Programs

Friday, October 03, 2014

Twice a month, in the evenings on the first and third Wednesday, the museum comes to life. 

It doesn't involve Ben Stiller or living statues - but the Neville's programs on Wednesday night offer some of the best opportunities around to learn and explore Geology, Astronomy and Independent Film - no movie tickets required.

This week, I'd like to highlight the International Film Series, presented by the Green Bay Film Society. Twice a month on Wednesdays a different independent film is shown in the Neville Theater, free of charge and open to the public. After the film, a discussion is held where the audience can offer questions and feedback, typically fielded by Associate professor of Humanistic and Global studies at UWGB, David Coury.In this case, the discussion was led by the film's main figure and co-director David Soap, as well as producer Kristina Kiehl.

This week's film was The Cherokee Word for Water, a feature-length motion picture inspired by the true story of the struggle for, opposition to, and ultimate success of a rural Cherokee community to bring running water to their families by using the traditional concept of "gadugi" working together to solve a problem.

What really struck me during the screening and subsequent discussion was just how powerful and inspiring a community can be; the Independent filmmaking community, the Native American community (as represented in the film), and the local geographic community. But as casual moviegoers and indie film buffs alike partook in the discussion with figureheads from the Cherokee community, it was clear that the separation between these communities was of little significance compared to their commonalities. 

Film is an incredibly powerful storytelling medium, and one that is becoming increasingly more accessible to small, independent filmmakers and those outside of a traditional studio setting. During the film's discussion it was announced that The Cherokee Word for Water would be made available to purchase directly as a digital download on the film's website, bypassing traditional distribution mechanisms. Through the rest of 2014 and into 2015 the Neville looks forward to partnering with the Green Bay Film Society to bring these stories, as well as their storytellers, to our community in a way that goes beyond what can be had at a theater or via DVD or Blu-ray. Check out the schedule of upcoming screenings here


Recent Posts


Tags


Archive