The Neville Public Museum

The Neville Blog

Stroll Through Time: Walking Tours of Historic Neighborhoods

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Preservation of historic buildings is a tough task that takes the cooperation of the Historic Preservation Commission and building owners.   On Tuesday night a group of Green Bay residents experienced this first hand when they joined Alderman Mark Steuer for a special walking tour of the Fort Howard neighborhood after his talk on Architecture, Planning, and Politics at the museum. 

Walking through the old homes in the different districts in Green Bay is a nostalgic experience that can speak to the building of our city and the development of our community.  During the walk on Tuesday night, Steuer and company spoke with homeowners and were even invited into the original Blesch home in the Fort HHome designed for Francis Blesch in 1905oward Neighborhood on N Oakland Ave.  This Greek Revival style home, built in 1905, is a rare find in Green Bay. The current homeowners spoke of the challenges in owning a historic home.  When the home was bought in foreclosure a few years ago the homeowners had to go before the planning commission to talk about the repairs they were taking on.

Another home which has gone through a similar transformation is the old Joannes home on S Madison St. in the Astor Neighborhood designed in 1902 for Mitchell and Fannie Joannes.  This Queen Anne style home, which was previously used as a multifamily home, was bought and renovated to reflect its original design.  A 360° virtual tour of this home can be found in the current exhibit Building Our CommunHome designed for Mitchell Joannes in 1902ity along with the original designs and floor plans. 

There’s no shortage of beautiful historic buildings in our community.  After collecting designs, histories and photographs of these structures with the help of the Berners-Schober Architectural Firm we decided to put together walking tours that people can do on their own to enjoy these historic buildings outside of a museum gallery.  We hope that one beautiful day you’ll take a tour of Downtown, the Allouez Neighborhood, the Astor Neighborhood, or the Fort Howard Neighborhood and enjoy the historic beauty that surrounds us in Green Bay.  

You can download these tours on our website or visit our Google Map site here.  You can also find them and many more buildings in the current exhibit Building Our Community: 100+ Years of Architecture & Design in Brown County open through March 26, 2016.   

 

Upcoming Building Our Community Events

Architectural Segway Tours

August 5th- More dates TBD

$30 members, $40 non-members

Green Bay Architectural History: Panel Discussion and Question

August 11th at 7pm

Free Program

 

 

Summer Programs at the Neville

Friday, July 10, 2015

This summer the Neville Public Museum is proud to host two amazing temporary exhibitions; Spies, Traitors, and Saboteurs:  Fear and Freedom in America on loan from the International Spy Museum in Washington D.C, and Building Our Community:  100 Years of Architecture and Design in Brown County, which was created in collaboration with architects from Berners-Schober A"Building Our Community: 100+ Years of Architecture & Design in Brown County"ssociates.

As if the exhibits weren’t enough, the Neville is providing the following free public programs that explore the themes within our galleries in greater detail!

Architecture, Planning, and Politics

Tuesday, July 14, 2015, 7:00 p.m.

Alderman Mark Steuer will discuss the development of the Fort Howard and Broadway districts, and the efforts of the Historic Preservation Commission to protect and maintain the city’s historic structures.   After the program join Mark for a walking tour of Fort Howard!

America's Most Infamous Terrorist Organization Goes Mainstream: The Ku Klux Klan Marches Down Pennsylvania Avenue

Tuesday, July 21, 2015, 6:00 p.m.

Join UW-Baraboo/Sauk County professor Mike Jacobs for a presentation about the Ku Klux Klan, America's most infamous and formidable terrorist organization. During the 1920s the KKK tried to cast itself as the true expression of American patriotism and the American people.  Millions of people agreed - joining the organization and diversifying their activities beyond their reputation of intimidation and violence. Hate in "Spies, Traitors, and Saboteurs"

Fear, Freedom, and Foreigners: Close to Home

Tuesday, July 28, 2015, 6:00 p.m.

Wisconsin reflected locally the national issues that this series, SPIES, TRAITORS, SABOTEURS: Fear and Freedom in America explores.  Dean Strang, J.D.  will present one of these local stories. A 1917 trail of Italian alleged anarchists in Milwaukee, in the first fearful days off this nation's fighting in WWI, became a proxy proceeding for the deadly, unsolved bombing of Milwaukee's central police station.  That nearly-forgotten bombing killed more American police officers than any other act of terror until September 11, 2001.  

Green Bay Architectural History

Tuesday, August 11, 2015, 7:00 p.m.       

Drawing on the architectural and engineering firm's 117+ year history, several members of Berners-Schober will hold a panel discussion on significant Green Bay structures.  The panel will include Ian Griffiths, Libby Parrish, Derek Gruber, and Kristin Pritchard, along with other firm members who were involved in researching their current Neville exhibit featuring the firm's buildings.  They will discuss the chronology of Green Bay's development through the work of the firm, and answer questions on historic business, public, and residential buildings.

Victorian Secrets at the Neville

Friday, May 08, 2015

A couple weeks ago, we had an interesting luncheon program here at the museum.  It featured a presentation on underwear…Victorian era underwear to be exact.  The Victorian period ranges from 1837-1901, beginning at the time of Queen Victoria’s reign and lasting until her death.   When we think about this time period we often think about the big dresses but what we overlook is how much is going on underneath.  

As the staff was thinking about this unique topic, our director decided this would be a great opportunity to display some artifacts from our collection that aren’t usually exhibited.  So we pulled these four pieces from storage for the program and our blog readers will get to view a special bonus artifact not featured in the program!

BustlesBustle

Object #375/248:  This bustle is a great example of a “man” made bustle from ca. 1880.  During the late 1800s men realized that there was money to be made in the ladies undergarment business and thought they could create a better bustle.  This spring bustle is made of the same springs that would be found in a bed or other furniture.  

Object #7220/3075: This bustle was meant to create the “swan” shape that was popular towards the end of the Victorian era ca. 1890.  It is padded with horsehair which you can actually see poking out in the image.  These types of bustles were mass produced.   Bustle

 

 

 

 

 

Drawers

Object #4192/1928: These drawers date to ca. 1850 and are handmade.  They are typical of the time in that the crotch is open but unique with the use of suspenders on the garment (drawstrings are more typical).  

 

Drawers

Chemise

 

 

Chemise 

Object #11,838/1984.82:  These undergarments were worn next to the skin to protect the outer garments from body oils and sweat.  The frills and decorative nature of this garment was most popular during the 1870s.  

Skirt Supporting Corset

 

Bonus: Skirt Supporting Corset

Object #4194/1928: Later in the Victorian era pieces of undergarments were combined into one piece, like this one.  This particular garment from ca. 1870 acted as a corset and a bustle to add lift to the skirt.  

 

The Neville would like to thank Leslie Bellais, curator of social history at the Wisconsin Historical Society for her entertaining presentation and her help in spotlighting the special history of these artifacts.

 

 

 

Leslie Bellais speaking at the Neville Public Museum

Adventure Ahoy! Summer Readers' Party

Sunday, October 05, 2014


Avast! There be pirates sailin’ these waters!

On Saturday, October 4th, the young buccaneers of Brown County Library’s Summer Reading Program hijacked the museum for an afternoon of pirate fun. Swashbucklers and landlubbers alike were treated to science shenanigans, handicrafts, and frolics related to water, aquatic beasties, boats, and pirates. There were plenty of activities to pillage and spoils to plunder. Highlights included instruction on how to Talk like a Pirate in 30 Minutes or Less, a special visit by Jonathan London’s Froggy, and a treasure hunt through the museum gallery.

Both the Neville Public Museum and the Brown County Library extend a special thank you to all of the volunteers who helped to make this event a success!

For information on how you can join the 2015 Summer Reading Program and obtain an invitation to next year’s party, please see the Brown County Library’s website.

Night at the Neville - Astronomy, Geology & Film Programs

Friday, October 03, 2014

Twice a month, in the evenings on the first and third Wednesday, the museum comes to life. 

It doesn't involve Ben Stiller or living statues - but the Neville's programs on Wednesday night offer some of the best opportunities around to learn and explore Geology, Astronomy and Independent Film - no movie tickets required.

This week, I'd like to highlight the International Film Series, presented by the Green Bay Film Society. Twice a month on Wednesdays a different independent film is shown in the Neville Theater, free of charge and open to the public. After the film, a discussion is held where the audience can offer questions and feedback, typically fielded by Associate professor of Humanistic and Global studies at UWGB, David Coury.In this case, the discussion was led by the film's main figure and co-director David Soap, as well as producer Kristina Kiehl.

This week's film was The Cherokee Word for Water, a feature-length motion picture inspired by the true story of the struggle for, opposition to, and ultimate success of a rural Cherokee community to bring running water to their families by using the traditional concept of "gadugi" working together to solve a problem.

What really struck me during the screening and subsequent discussion was just how powerful and inspiring a community can be; the Independent filmmaking community, the Native American community (as represented in the film), and the local geographic community. But as casual moviegoers and indie film buffs alike partook in the discussion with figureheads from the Cherokee community, it was clear that the separation between these communities was of little significance compared to their commonalities. 

Film is an incredibly powerful storytelling medium, and one that is becoming increasingly more accessible to small, independent filmmakers and those outside of a traditional studio setting. During the film's discussion it was announced that The Cherokee Word for Water would be made available to purchase directly as a digital download on the film's website, bypassing traditional distribution mechanisms. Through the rest of 2014 and into 2015 the Neville looks forward to partnering with the Green Bay Film Society to bring these stories, as well as their storytellers, to our community in a way that goes beyond what can be had at a theater or via DVD or Blu-ray. Check out the schedule of upcoming screenings here


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